Hamburg Middle School

  • NEW RACE CHART 11/18/16

     

    November 15th Power Point

     

    English Language Arts 7

     

    Mrs. Luders  pluders@hamburgschools.org

    Mrs. Perri  jperri@hamburgschools.org

     

    THE FOLLOWING LETTER IS COMING HOME WITH STUDENTS TODAY (11/18/16). PLEASE SIGN & SEND BACK TO SCHOOL WITH YOUR CHILD!

     

    Dear Team 5 Parents & Guardians,

    Thank you for supporting the Independent Reading Project (IRP) program during 1st quarter.  We are making a few modifications for 2nd quarter to improve student performance.

    Students will continue to read three IRP books and write three one-pagers during the quarter.  One-pagers should fill the page they are written on and include 2-3 pieces of text evidence from the book.

    The first change is that students will have a due date for each one-pager.  For the 2nd quarter, students must submit their one-pagers by the following deadlines:

    • December 2, 2016 - 1st one-pager due

    • January 6, 2017 – 2nd one-pager due

    • January 27, 2017 – 3rd one-pager due

    Students who are not meeting the deadlines will be required to attend lunch detention to complete missing/incomplete one-pagers.

    The other change for 2nd quarter is that students will be required to turn in a completed RACE chart with each one-pager.  A RACE chart is a brainstorming chart to help students organize their thoughts and ideas.  

    Thank you for your continued support of the IRP program!

     

     

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    IRP  Fiction Writing Prompts

     

    Directions:  Chose a prompt to respond to about your IRP book!  Use R.A.C.E., the Writing with Evidence Strategy, to organize your response.  A response should be written on the correct one-pager form in this packet, in 1 (one) organized paragraph, and include: title, author, genre and text evidence from your independent reading book (with page numbers).

     

    Fiction

    1. What is the problem or conflict of your book?  Which characters are involved?  How do you think the problem or conflict might be solved?

     

    1. What is the setting of your story?  Remember that setting is both place and time of the story.  Your book will most likely not tell you exactly when and where it takes place, but you can find clues in the story.  Be sure to tell the clues that give the setting of your story.

     

    1. Are the events in your book realistic or unrealistic?  Could they really happen, are they fantasy, or a mix of both?  Explain using specific examples from the book.

     

    1. Explain how a character in your book reminds you of yourself or someone you know.  For example, do you or a friend or relative, like some of the same things, have some of the same interests, or have similar problems as a character in your book?

     

    1. Tell why you chose your book to read.  What factors went into your decision (interesting cover, back cover, recommendation)? 

     

    1. Who is the main character in your book?  What is this character like?  Tell the character’s name, age, appearance, friends, personality, and problems…

     

    1. If you were the main character in your book, how would you handle the situation he or she faces in the story?  Be sure to briefly describe the situation before telling how you would handle it.

     

    1. What do you think of the title of your book?  Is it a good title?  Does it fit your book?  Why do you think the author chose this title?  Explain how the title fits the book or make up a better title and tell why the new title is better.

     

    1. Who is the antagonist (bad guy) in your book?  Describe this character and the way they “oppose”, or work against, the main character.

     

    1. Which character in your book do you like the least?  Name this character, tell what part they play in the story, and describe why you don’t like the character.

     

    1. How did the main character in your book change or grow from the beginning to end?

     

    1. Was there a moment when the author made us feel the most suspense?  When?

     

    1. What hints did the author give us about the how the story would end?

     

    1. What caused the story to end the way it did: the character’s luck, hard work, skill, or a bright idea?  What is more important in real life?

     

     

     

    IRP  Non-Fiction Writing Prompts

     

    Directions:  Chose a prompt to respond to about your IRP book!  Use R.A.C.E., the Writing with Evidence Strategy, to organize your response.  A response should be written on the correct one-pager form in this packet, in 1 (one) organized paragraph, and include: title, author, genre and text evidence from your independent reading book (with page numbers).

     

    Non-Fiction

    1.      What are 3 facts you learned about the topic of your book, and why these facts are significant?

     

    2.      What is one thing you learned that surprised or startled you?  Why?

     

    If you are reading about a PLACE:

    3.      Would you want to visit this place? Why or why not?

     

    4.      How is this place similar to or different from the place where you live?

     

    5.      What sort of people/plants/animals live in this place? How do you know?

     

    If you are reading about a PERSON (biography or autobiography):

    6.      Would you want to be friends with this person? Why or why not?

     

    7.       If you were to meet this person, what are three questions you would want to ask them about themselves? Why?

     

    8.      Imagine that you are going to buy this person a gift for their birthday. What do you decide to buy them, and why? (You can spend as much money as you need)

     

    9.      If you could go back in time to any point in this person’s life, what would it be and why?

     

     

     

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